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glossary


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domain name

A domain name is the unique name of a computer on the Internet that distinguishes it from the other systems on the network. They are sometimes colloquially (and incorrectly) referred to by marketers as "web addresses".

Every website, email account, etc, on the Internet is hosted on at least one computer (server). Each server has a unique IP address which is nothing but a set of numbers, such as "207.142.131.235" . To access a particular internet service, one can specify its IP address in an appropriate application, such as an FTP client; however because it is difficult to remember numbers, an IP address can be associated with a fully qualified host name (a domain name), such as "netwisesolutions.com". Domain names also provide a persistent address for some service when it is necessary to move to a different server, which would have a different IP address.

Each set of letters and numbers between the dots is called a label in parlance of the domain name service (DNS). There are some rules about the size and make up of labels. Each must start with a letter or number, and then may be made up of letters, numbers, and hyphens, to a maximum of 63 characters. These are the rules imposed by the way names are looked up ("resolved") by DNS. Some top level domains (see below) impose more rules, like a minimum length, on some labels. Fully qualified names are sometimes written with a final dot.

Translating numeric addresses to alphabetical ones, domain names allow Internet users to localize and visit websites. Additionally since more than one IP address can be assigned to a domain name, and more than one domain name assigned to an IP address, one server can have multiple roles, and one role can be spread among multiple servers.  
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Web design


Web design is the design or designing of a Web page, Website or Web application. The term generally refers to the graphical side of Web development using images, CSS and XHTML.
  
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Web development


Web development incorporates all areas of creating a Web site for the World Wide Web. This includes Web design (graphic design, XHTML, CSS, usability and semantics), programming, server administration, content management, marketing, testing and deployment. The term can also specifically be used to refer to the "back end", that is, programming and server administration. There are usually more than one member that works on a given Web Development team, each specialising in his or her own field.
  
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Web hosting

Web hosting is a service that provides Internet users with online systems for storing information, images, video, or any content accessible via the web. Web hosts are companies that provide space on a web server they own for use by their clients as well as providing Internet connectivity, typically in a data center. Web hosts can also provide data center space and connectivity to the Internet for servers they do not own to be located in their data center.

The term web server can mean one of two things:

a computer responsible for serving web pages, mostly HTML documents, via the HTTP protocol to clients, mostly web browsers;
a software program that is working as a daemon serving web documents.
Connections to HTTP servers are made using web browsers.

Web Hosting

anonymous FTP - an option in FTP that allows users to download files without having to establish and account.

Apache - an open source web server software.

ASP Hosting - Web hosting that supports Active Server Pages, a server-side scripting environment from Microsoft.

autoresponder - a program that sends an automatic form response to incoming emails.

bandwidth - how much data can be transmitted in a time period over a communications channel, often expressed in kilobits per second (kbps).

burstable bandwidth - a hosting option that allows sites to use the available network capacity to handle periods of peak usage.

business hosting - Web hosting geared towards the mission-critical functions demanded by business-class customers.

colocated hosting - hosting option whereby the host provides and is responsible for the equipment, dedicating an entire server to the client's websites.

ColdFusion hosting - Web hosting that supports ColdFusion, a web application language introduced by Allaire and currently owned by Macromedia.

data transfer - The total amount of outbound traffic from a website*, typically measured in gigabytes (Gb).

dedicated hosting - hosting option whereby the host provides and is responsible for the equipment, dedicating an entire server to the client's websites.

dedicated IP - an IP address dedicated to a single website.

web hosting - the business of providing the storage, connectivity, and services necessary to serve files for a website.

  
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search engine


A search engine is a program designed to help find information stored on a computer system such as the World Wide Web, or a personal computer. The search engine allows one to ask for content meeting specific criteria (typically those containing a given word or phrase) and retrieving a list of references that match those criteria. Search engines use regularly updated indexes to operate quickly and efficiently.

Without further qualification, search engine usually refers to a Web search engine, which searches for information on the public Web. Other kinds of search engine are enterprise search engines, which search on intranet's and personal search engines, which search individual personal computers.

Some search engines also mine data available in newsgroups, large databases, or open directories like DMOZ.org. Unlike Web directories, which are maintained by human editors, search engines operate algorithmically.
  
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Online Marketing


Online Advertising is Advertising on the Internet.

The are two sides to online advertising, a legitimate one and an illegitimate one. The legitimate side of online advertising includes advertising networks and opt-in e-mail advertising. The illegitimate side is dominated by spamming.

Online advertising is delivered by web servers to browsers. In some many cases, ads can be delivered by a central ad server to a browser.

  
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Search engine optimisation (SEO)

Search engine optimisation (SEO) is a set of methodologies aimed at improving the visibility of a website in search engine listings. The term also refers to an industry of consultants that carry out optimization projects on behalf of client sites.

Paid inclusion is a fee-based model for submitting website listings to search engines. Historically, search engines have allowed webmasters, as well as SEO's and the general public, to freely submit sites for consideration. However, a pattern of abuse began to develop among less-reputable SEO firms, who flooded the engines with non-stop submissions of pages. Analysis of these submissions strained the search engines' capacity, necessitating the creation of artificial limits, including fees.

The fee structure is used by search engines as a filter against superfluous submissions, and also as a revenue generator. Typically, the fee covers an annual subscription for one webpage, which will automatically be cataloged on a regular basis. Search engines still offer free submit forms, but make no promises as to the timeliness of the cataloging process through this channel.

Google has a particularly ethical way of handling paid placement. Their main results are uninfluenced by payments, but paid "AdWords" drive small, visually distinct text-only ads, so the user is able to tell which matches were the result of a payment. Google also uses various methods to prevent paid placement of truly irrelevant content.

Ethical and unethical SEO methods

To obtain maximum search engine visibility, it is essential to understand how the target audience is searching for actual information on a web site. When the target audience uses a search engine to find products and services, they type a set of words or phrases into the search box. This set of words is commonly called targeted keywords or phrases.

For the target audience to find a site on the search engines, the page must contain keyword phrases that match the phrases the target audience is typing into search queries.

When a search engine spider analyzes a web page, it determines keyword relevancy based on an algorithm, which is a formula that calculates how web pages are ranked. The most important text for a search engine is the most important text for the target audience - the text your target audience is going to read when they arrive at your web site.

At its worst, SEO becomes spamdexing, the promotion of irrelevant, chiefly commercial, pages through taking advantage of the search algorithms. Indeed, many search engine administrators say that any form of search engine optimization used to improve a website's page rank is spamdexing. However, over time a widespread consensus has developed in the industry as to what are and are not acceptable means of boosting one's search engine placement and resultant traffic.

Arguably, the most ethical method is to have worthwhile content on one's Web site, to which many other Web sites will voluntarily link. There are also few who would question the ethics of informing other relevant sites around the web of one's own content and asking for links, although as relevance diminishes this becomes a more dubious practice.

Equally, virtually no one would question the ethics of choosing the vocabulary of your site (and especially of your page titles) to emphasize words that you know are often searched for by people in your market. Again, the ethics of this becomes shadier if the words in question are not relevant.

It is certainly ethical (in fact it is highly recommended) to add a "site map" page to your site, linked either from the home page or from every page on your site. Such a page guarantees that once a spider has found your site, it will be able to traverse and index the entire site.

Cloaking - any of several means to serve up a different page to the search-engine spider than will be seen by human users - is one of the most controversial methods of search engine optimization. To wit, cloaking can be an illegitimate attempt to mislead search engines regarding the content on a particular Web site. On the other hand, it can be used to provide human users with more or less equivalent content that a search engine would not be able to process or parse. Another ethical use of cloaking is providing accessibility to Web sites for blind people and people with other disabilities. A good benchmark on whether a given act of cloaking is ethical is precisely whether it enhances accessibility.

Link spam - Occasionally a problem for some search engines such as Google, which can be fooled into assigning higher relevance to a site based on thousands of inbound links that weren't properly "earned" by the site. Google's sensitivity to linking makes it susceptible to webmasters who solicit or place links randomly on other sites, placing a desired keyword into the hyperlinked text of the inbound link. Commonly called "Googlebombing", it can be a prank (type "miserable failure" into Google to demonstrate), or a deliberate attempt to influence ranking for commercial gain.

Unethical SEO methods & Techniques

Mirror sites
Doorway pages
Cloaking
Link farms
Googleating
Keyword stuffing

These are all widely acknowledged as being spam, or "black hat". We do not do this. Please be wary of those that do or claim to be able to obtain a 'number one search engine ranking' for you.

Search engine optimization (SEO) is a set of methodologies aimed at improving the visibility of a website in search engine listings. The term also refers to an industry of consultants that carry out optimization projects on behalf of client sites.

Paid inclusion is a fee-based model for submitting website listings to search engines. Historically, search engines have allowed webmasters, as well as SEO's and the general public, to freely submit sites for consideration. However, a pattern of abuse began to develop among less-reputable SEO firms, who flooded the engines with non-stop submissions of pages. Analysis of these submissions strained the search engines' capacity, necessitating the creation of artificial limits, including fees.

The fee structure is used by search engines as a filter against superfluous submissions, and also as a revenue generator. Typically, the fee covers an annual subscription for one webpage, which will automatically be cataloged on a regular basis. Search engines still offer free submit forms, but make no promises as to the timeliness of the cataloging process through this channel.

Google has a particularly ethical way of handling paid placement. Their main results are uninfluenced by payments, but paid "AdWords" drive small, visually distinct text-only ads, so the user is able to tell which matches were the result of a payment. Google also uses various methods to prevent paid placement of truly irrelevant content.

Ethical and unethical SEO methods

To obtain maximum search engine visibility, it is essential to understand how the target audience is searching for actual information on a web site. When the target audience uses a search engine to find products and services, they type a set of words or phrases into the search box. This set of words is commonly called targeted keywords or phrases.

For the target audience to find a site on the search engines, the page must contain keyword phrases that match the phrases the target audience is typing into search queries.

When a search engine spider analyzes a web page, it determines keyword relevancy based on an algorithm, which is a formula that calculates how web pages are ranked. The most important text for a search engine is the most important text for the target audience - the text your target audience is going to read when they arrive at your web site.

At its worst, SEO becomes spamdexing, the promotion of irrelevant, chiefly commercial, pages through taking advantage of the search algorithms. Indeed, many search engine administrators say that any form of search engine optimization used to improve a website's page rank is spamdexing. However, over time a widespread consensus has developed in the industry as to what are and are not acceptable means of boosting one's search engine placement and resultant traffic.

Arguably, the most ethical method is to have worthwhile content on one's Web site, to which many other Web sites will voluntarily link. There are also few who would question the ethics of informing other relevant sites around the web of one's own content and asking for links, although as relevance diminishes this becomes a more dubious practice.

Equally, virtually no one would question the ethics of choosing the vocabulary of your site (and especially of your page titles) to emphasize words that you know are often searched for by people in your market. Again, the ethics of this becomes shadier if the words in question are not relevant.

It is certainly ethical (in fact it is highly recommended) to add a "site map" page to your site, linked either from the home page or from every page on your site. Such a page guarantees that once a spider has found your site, it will be able to traverse and index the entire site.

Cloaking - any of several means to serve up a different page to the search-engine spider than will be seen by human users - is one of the most controversial methods of search engine optimization. To wit, cloaking can be an illegitimate attempt to mislead search engines regarding the content on a particular Web site. On the other hand, it can be used to provide human users with more or less equivalent content that a search engine would not be able to process or parse. Another ethical use of cloaking is providing accessibility to Web sites for blind people and people with other disabilities. A good benchmark on whether a given act of cloaking is ethical is precisely whether it enhances accessibility.

Link spam - Occasionally a problem for some search engines such as Google, which can be fooled into assigning higher relevance to a site based on thousands of inbound links that weren't properly "earned" by the site. Google's sensitivity to linking makes it susceptible to webmasters who solicit or place links randomly on other sites, placing a desired keyword into the hyperlinked text of the inbound link. Commonly called "Googlebombing", it can be a prank (type "miserable failure" into Google to demonstrate), or a deliberate attempt to influence ranking for commercial gain.

Unethical SEO methods & Techniques

Mirror sites
Doorway pages
Cloaking
Link farms
Googleating
Keyword stuffing

These are all widely acknowledged as being spam, or "black hat". We do not do this. Please be wary of those that do or claim to be able to obtain a 'number one search engine ranking' for you.

  
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Cookie

A cookie is a small file that a webserver creates on your machine. Sometimes the cookie will not be stored as a file if it has no expiry time in which case the cookie is stored in your browsers header information and expires when you close your browser.

Cookies are useful to websites in order to keep track of or temporarily store data to be retrieved later on in a process.   
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FTP (File Transfer Protocol)

To FTP is to connect a FTP client to an FTP server, most browsers such as Internet Explorer support FTP and therefor they can be classed also as an FTP client. An example FTP connection would be FTP.MYSITE.COM if MYSITE.COM has an FTP server you would either be able to log on anonymously to download/upload files or you might be promted for a password.  
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Gateway

A gateway is a program that transfers one protocol or language data into a format that another program not using the same protocols/language may understand. Another meaning is a service such as AOL providing a gateway to the internet.  
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HTTP

HyperText Transfer Protocol, is the method to which browsers/programs transfer hypertext files or web pages accross communication lines. HTTP requires a web server and a web client(browser) to interact with the hypertext files. An example would be connecting to http://www.asite.com, when you goto this site in any browser the browser sends a request to the HTTP(Web server) the web server will then send your browser the default page (Home page) for the site you requested.   
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Firewall

A firewall is a piece of software/hardware that seperates your internet connection for security reasons. It monitors what programs are trying to access your system and what programs are trying to access the internet from within your system. The purpose is to stop rouge programs from accessing and corrupting your system and also stop rouge programs which are already on your system from spreading on the internet and also sending personal data. One software firewall is zone alarm which is one of the most popular personal firewalls. Advanced firewall software will have lists of common viruses/Spyware and trojans it will monitor for these activities and give you detailed reports of the culprit application on detection.  
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PHP

Pre-Hypertext-Processing, is similar to the ASP language. PHP is used to preformat web page content before it is sent to the client. It can do jobs such as retrieve database information and insert the required results into the web page you have requested. PHP is incorporated into the actual web page file and is processed by the HTTP (Web Server) before being sent to your browser.  
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Login

Login is the process of authentication. Most web sites have a login method. Generally this is a username and a passsword which you will assign or be assigned during the registration stage. Logging into a site is often required so the site can verify who you are and also track what you do on their site such as adding comments in a forum, the site will know who you are because of the login stage and any comment you add in that forum will be marked with your username which sometimes is a link to your profile or personal website.  
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XML

eXtended Markup Language provides sites with a method of easily inserting content dynamically into a web page. XML also provides an easy way to provide content between different web sites and companies.  
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Webmonkey

A web monkey is an amateur web designer who stiches together snippets of HTML and javascript code found on the internet and in books and puts them together to make a web page or web application, without having an appreciation or understanding what the principles behind the code or the concept of coding are.   
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Paypal

Paypal is an associated company with ebay. It provides an easy way to pay for goods on the internet. Paypal also provides small businesses and individuals with an easy way to accept credit/debit card payments on their website. Paypal provides buyers and sellers with an easy interface to view their transactions and upload or download money to/from bank accounts.  
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Java

Java is a programming language developed by Sun Microsystems. Java is a powerful cross platform language as it is operating system independant. Java is used primarily in association with other internet java technologies.  
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SPAM

SPAM is the posting (Mass mailing) of unsolicited emails. A spammer is the person(s) responsible for the unsolicited emails. SPAM is usually sent to either con you into a service you don't want or to extract private information from you. It is also used to advertise legitimate and illegitimate companies.  
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Server

A server has two meanings it is:

1) the machine which is serving out information/documents.
2) the software application/service which serves out documents or specific information for a client program to view or recieve.

An example would be this web page, when you navigated here you sent a request to our HTTP (Web Server) which did any parsing of server side code (ASP, PHP) in the document it then sent out the page to your ipaddress where the browser was looking on port 80 which saw the incoming document retrieved the data, processed it and displayed this page.  
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File Format

A file format is the way in which a file has been saved. A file format of *.exe would idicate that it is a windows executable file which can be run on a windows operating system. Every file on a computer has a file format which is indicated by its extension type (*.exe, where * is the file name). Every file type has a program associated with it even though other programs may be able to use the file. Image files also have certain types the most common of which for the internet is *.GIF and *.JPEG, if you ever upload an image to the web these are probably the file formats that will be accepted whilst other types will be rejected.  
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ActiveX

This Microsoft-based technology was built to link desktop applications to the World Wide Web. Using ActiveX development tools, software developers can create interactive Web content for their applications. For example, Word and Excel documents can be viewed directly in Web browsers that supports ActiveX. While ActiveX is a useful technology, the downside is that you need to have a up-to-date version ActiveX installed on your machine in order to use ActiveX-enabled content.  
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Adware

Adware is free software that is supported by advertisements. Common adware programs are toolbars that sit on your desktop or work in conjunction with your Web browser. They include features like advanced searching of the Web or your hard drive and better organization of your bookmarks and shortcuts. Adware can also be more advanced programs such as games or utilities. They are free to use, but require you to watch advertisements as long as the programs are open. Since the ads often allow you to click to a Web site, adware typically requires an active Internet connection to run.

Most adware is safe to use, but some can serve as spyware, gathering information about you from your hard drive, the Web sites you visit, or your keystrokes. Spyware programs can then send the information over the Internet to another computer. So be careful what adware you install on your computer. Make sure it is from a reputable company and read the privacy agreement that comes with it.  
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PPC (Pay per Click)

In a PPC agreement, the advertiser only pays for qualifying clicks to the destination site based on a prearranged per-click rate. Popular PPC advertising options include per-click advertising networks, search engines, and affiliate programs.

Paying per click is sometimes seen by some as a middle ground between paying per impression and paying per action. When paying per impression, the advertiser assumes the risk of low-quality traffic generated by the publisher. When getting paid for actions, the publisher assumes the risk of low-converting offers by the advertiser. In the PPC model, the publisher does not have to worry about the sales conversion rate of the target site, and the advertiser does not have to worry about how many impressions it takes to attract the specified number of clicks.  
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Reciprocal links

Reciprocal links are based on an agreement by two sites to link to each other. Reciprocal linking is often used by small/midsize sites as an inexpensive way to increase Web site traffic and link popularity.  
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Advertising Metrics

click-through - the process of clicking through an online advertisement to the advertiser's destination.

click-through rate (CTR) - The average number of click-throughs per hundred ad impressions, expressed as a percentage.

conversion rate - the percentage of visitors who take a desired action.

cost-per-action (CPA) - online advertising payment model in which payment is based solely on qualifying actions such as sales or registrations.

cost-per-click (CPC) - the cost or cost-equivalent paid per click-through.

CPM - cost per thousand impressions.

customer acquisition cost - the cost associated with acquiring a new customer.

hit - request of a file from a Web server.

hybrid model - a combination of two or more online marketing payment models.

impression - a single instance of an online advertisement being displayed.*

page view - request to load a single HTML page.

pay per click (PPC) - online advertising payment model in which payment is based solely on qualifying click-throughs.

pay per lead (PPL) - online advertising payment model in which payment is based solely based on qualifying leads.

pay per sale (PPS) - online advertising payment model in which payment is based solely based on qualifying sales.

site stickiness - the amount of time spent at a site over a given time period.

unique visitors - individuals who have visited a Web site (or network) at least once in a fixed time frame, typically a 30 day period.

Web site traffic - the amount of visitors and visits a Web site receives.  
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Banner Ads

Love them or hate them, banner ads are one of the dominant forms of advertising online. Due to the widespread acceptance of the standard 468x60 banner ad size, buyers can easily secure placements at most sites, and publishers can accept ads from most advertisers.

Banner ads were initially judged primarily on the basis of click-through rate (CTR). In the early days of the Web, click-through rates were generally much higher than they are now, perhaps due to the novelty factor. Other causes for the decline in CTR may include technical limitations, the awkward horizontal shape, poor banner design, an excessive percentage of run-of-network buys, and accumulated bad experiences of Web surfers.

"Banners never work" is a common refrain from the anti-banner crowd. Although click-through rates have gone consistently downward, the same can be said of banner ad prices. It is still possible to achieve a click-through rate many times the industry average by combining good placement and design. Combining below-average ad rates and above-average response rates can lead to an acceptable return on investment, just as in any other advertising medium.   
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SEO

SEO is the process of choosing targeted keyword phrases related to a site, and ensuring that the site places well when those keyword phrases are part of a Web search.

There is much confusion about search engine optimisation (SEO) and its relation to search engine spamming. Generally, legitimate search engine optimization adds to the user experience, while search engine spamming takes away from the user experience, although there is much gray area between the clear-cut examples on either side.

Optimisation involves making pages readable to search engines and emphasizing key topics related to your content. Basic optimization may involve nothing more than ensuring that a site does not unnecessarily become part of the invisible Web (the portion of the Web not accessible through Web search engines). Advanced optimization may include significant research into every element of page design, site structure, and off-the-page criteria.

Before pages can be optimized, research must be done to determine which keywords to target. This involves finding relevant keywords, determining their popularity, assessing the amount of competition, and deciding which keywords can be best supported with quality content.

Pricing Models Include:
one-time flat fee
monthly fixed fee
pay-per-click
pay-per-ranking
revenue sharing  
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Deep linking

Deep linking has only begun to spark mild controversies in recent times as the Web has become more commercialized. In fact, one of the fundamental strengths of the Web is the ability for any public document to connect to any other public document.

The legality of deep linking has been called into question in several lawsuits involving well-known corporations. Opponents of deep links -- typically large corporations -- argue that deep linking unfairly eliminates the ability of the home page to contribute to brand building and ad serving functions.

Proponents of deep linking contend that the ability to link freely is central to the philosophy behind the public Internet. On a practical note, they also argue that a deep link is better than no link at all, and may even be more profitable than a home page link, especially if the target site has a poor navigational structure.  
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Linking Strategy

link checker - tool used to check for broken hyperlinks.

deep linking - linking to a web page other than a site's home page.

inbound link - a link from a site outside of your site.

outbound link - a link to a site outside of your site.

reciprocal links - links between two sites, often based on an agreement by the site owners to exchange links.  
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Link Checker

A tool used to check for broken hyperlinks.

Link checking is one aspect of site management -- the regular maintenance necessary to keep a site up-to-date.

A "broken hyperlink" does not correctly point to the intended destination page. The most common scenario involves a hyperlink "breaking" when the destination page is deleted or moved to another location.

Basic link checking involves testing for "404 - File Not Found" responses. Many link checkers are test for slow-loading pages, noting pages that fail to respond within a reasonable time limit.

While link checking tools eliminate a considerable amount of manual work, they do not completely eliminate the need for human review. For example, a page can return a valid response, but the content can change drastically -- especially in the case of expired domains and objectionable content.  
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Inbound link or upstream link

A link from a site outside of your site.

Inbound links send visitors to your web site. Generally, this is seen as a good thing. Many sites go to great lengths to achieve as much of this "free" advertising as possible, although a few sites are very particular about where the links are pointing (see deep linking).  
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Outbound link or downstream link

A link to a site outside of your site.

Outbound links send visitors away from your web site. Attitudes towards outbound links vary considerably among site owners. Some site owners still link freely. Some refuse to link at all, and some provide links that open in a new browser window.

Opponents of outbound linking argue that it risks losing time and money from site visitors. This can be a large risk if a site is facing high customer acquisition costs.

Proponents argue that providing high quality references actually enhances the value of a site and increases the chance of return visitors.  
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Netiquette

The term netiquette is commonly used in reference to popular forms of online communication, including email, forums and chat.

While some netiquette issues are technical in nature, all fundamentally concern how people relate to each other. Once the technical nuances are grasped and abstract concepts are understood, online etiquette is not much different than offline etiquette.

What does netiquette have to do with marketing?

It is essential to have a good understanding of acceptable ways to communicate with potential customers. In the worst-case scenario, violating the code of conduct for a community (ex. using spam) may get you banned from the community. It is possible to be banned from forums, search engines, ISPs and webhosts.  
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Online advertising

advertising network - a network representing many Web sites in selling advertising, allowing advertising buyers to reach broad audiences relatively easily through run-of-category and run-of-network buys.

caching - the storage of Web files for later re-use at a point more quickly accessed by the end user.

frequency cap - restriction on the amount of times a specific visitor is shown a particular advertisement.

house ad - self-promotional ad a company runs on its media outlets to put unsold inventory to use.

keyword marketing - putting your message in front of people who are searching using particular keywords and keyphrases.

rate card - document detailing prices for various ad placement options.

rep firm - ad sales partner specializing primarily in single-site sales.

run-of-network (RON) - ad buying option in which ad placements may appear on any pages on sites within an ad network.

run-of-site (ROS) - ad buying option in which ad placements may appear on any pages on sites within an ad network.

self-serve advertising - advertising that can be purchased without the assistance of a sales representative.

sponsorship - advertising that seeks to establish a deeper association and integration between an advertiser and a publisher, often involving coordinated beyond-the-banner placements.

underdelivery - delivery of less impressions, visitors, or conversions than contracted for a specified period of time.  
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ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line)

A DSL line where the upload speed is different from the download speed. Usually the download speed is much greater.   
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Apache

The most common web server (or HTTP server) software on the Internet. Apache is an open-source application originally created from a series of changes ("patches") made to a web server written at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, the same place the Mosiac web browser was created.

Apache is designed as a set of modules, enabling administrators to choose which features they wish to use and making it easy to add features to meet specific needs inlcuding handling protocols other than the web-standard HTTP.   
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Applet

A small Java program that can be embedded in an HTML page. Applets differ from full-fledged Java applications in that they are not allowed to access certain resources on the local computer, such as files and serial devices (modems, printers, etc.), and are prohibited from communicating with most other computers across a network. The common rule is that an applet can only make an Internet connection to the computer from which the applet was sent.   
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Application Server

Server software that manages one or more other pieces of software in a way that makes the managed software available over a network, usually to a Web server. By having a piece of software manage other software packages it is possible to use resources like memory and database access more efficiently than if each of the managed packages responded directly to requests.   
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ASCII

American Standard Code for Information Interchange is the worldwide standard for the code numbers used by computers to represent all the upper and lowercase Latin letters, numbers, punctuation, etc. There are 128 standard ASCII codes each of which can be represented by a 7 digit binary number.  
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DHTML

Dynamic Hypertext Markup Language, is the use of html with the inclusion of other web development languages such as javascript or vbscript. DHTML provides a more feature rich experience to the user. DHTML is not a scripting language it is the concept of combining a scripting language with html.  
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HTML

Hyper Text Mark-up Language, is the standard scripting language for web pages. HTML doesn't do anything other than instruct the web browser as to how the page should appear. HTML is made up by sets of tags for example <b>This text is bold because it is inbetween the two bold tags</b>  
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Open Source

Open Source generally refers to open source software. This is free software to which the author has also made the actual source code available to the general public.  
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Browser

A browser is what you are viewing this page with now. Browsers recieve web documents such as HTML documents proccess them and display the contents accordingly. Different results are sometimes displayed between different browsers as they don't all process the document in the same way. There are many types of browsers such as Internet Explorer, Opera, Firefox and Netscape. The first browser created was called Mosaic which was created by the Netscape Corporation.  
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Blog (weB LOG)

A blog is basically a journal that is available on the web. The activity of updating a blog is "blogging" and someone who keeps a blog is a "blogger." Blogs are typically updated daily using software that allows people with little or no technical background to update and maintain the blog.   
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Javascript

Javascript is a scripting language used incorporation with a web page (HTML file). Javascript has a varied amount of uses and is generally used on websites to calculate data, verify data, and provide a richer experience for users.  
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SQL (Structured Query Language)

SQL is a language used for creating, modifying and retrieving data from a database. SQL is a powerful ally to any data driven website. SQL can perform a hugh number of tasks on data to provide users with relevant content. An example would be to search articles on a web site, SQL would be used to retrieve all articles from the database that contains your specified keywords. Each glossary term you see on this page has been retrieved from a database using a SQL query.   
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ASP (Active Server Page)

ASP is a pre-processing language it is a combined HTML file which contains code within <% & %> tags as well as normal HTML code. Before the file is passed on to a browser it will be processed by the HTTP server which will run the code in-between the tags do something and output any results into the file which the requested browser will display.  
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CSS

Cascading Style Sheet is a method of defining how objects on a web page should appear to the user. CSS has become very popular as it eleminates some inconsistencies amongst different browsers. It is also an easy method of quickly updating the style/look of objects on a web page as they only need to be defined once and can be applied to many objects.  
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Search Engine Marketing

description tag - an HTML tag used by Web page authors to provide a description for search engine listings.

doorway domain - a domain used specifically to rank well in search engines for particular keywords, serving as an entry point through which visitors pass to the main domain.

doorway page - a page made specifically to rank well in search engines for particular keywords, serving as an entry point through which visitors pass to the main content.

invisible Web - the portion of the Web not accessible through Web search engines.

keyword - a word used in a performing a search.

keyword density - keywords as a percentage of indexable text words.

keyword research - the search for keywords related to your Web site, and the analysis of which ones yield the highest return on investment (ROI).

keywords tag - META tag used to help define the primary keywords of a Web page.

link popularity - a measure of the quantity and quality of sites that link to your site.

link text - the text contained in (and sometimes near) a hyperlink.

log file - file that records the activity on a Web server.

manual submission - adding a URL to the search engines individually by hand.

meta tag generator - tool that will output META tags based on input page information.

meta tags - tags to describe various aspects about a Web page.

pay per click search engine - search engine where results are ranked according to the bid amount, and advertisers are charged when a searcher clicks on the search listing.

search engine optimization - the process of choosing targeted keyword phrases related to a site, and ensuring that the site places well when those keyword phrases are part of a Web search.

search engine submission - the act of supplying a URL to a search engine in an attempt to make a search engine aware of a site or page.

search spy - a perpetually refreshing page that provides a real-time view of actual Web searches.

title tag - HTML tag used to define the text in the top line of a Web browser, also used by many search engines as the title of search listings.

top 10 - the top ten search engine results for a particular search term.

URL - location of a resource on the Internet.

volunteer directory - a Web directory staffed primarily by unpaid volunteer editors.  
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Business and eBusiness

application service provider - provider of applications/services that are distributed through a network to many customers in exchange for a stream of smaller payments as opposed to one fixed, upfront price.

B2B - business that sells products or provides services to other businesses.

B2C - business that sells products or provides services to end-user consumers.

disintermediation - the elimination of intermediaries in the supply chain, also referred to as "cutting out the middlemen."

guerilla marketing - unconventional marketing intended to get maximum results from minimal resources.

free - without monetary cost.

first-mover advantage - a sometimes insurmountable advantage gained by the first significant company to move into a new market.

interactive agency - an agency offering a mix of Web design/development, Internet advertising/marketing, or E-Business/E-Commerce consulting.

marketing - < link to definitions of marketing >

marketing plan - the part of the business plan outlining the marketing strategy for a product or service.

network effect - the phenomenon whereby a service becomes more valuable as more people use it, thereby encouraging ever-increasing numbers of adopters.  

a down to earth approach